Shot Power, Quickness & Stickwork

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There are many components that go into a good shot, so you need a good foundation of building blocks so that you can practice all your skills and take them to the ice.

The major difference between an average goal scorer and an elite goal scorer, is their ability to get the shot off quick.By having a quick release, this will allow you to have a step up on the goaltender, preventing them from getting set-up in the net to make the stop. When it comes to having a quick and effective release, it’s important to consider the following drills.

Let’s get into using these skills for next level moves.Have you’ve ever wondered how to pull off the flashy “zorro” move? Master this, and you can even take a shot on the net! Be the envy of everyone who sees you pull it off! This drill will help you to get in the motion of receiving the puck and getting in position for releasing a shot quickly. The toe drag and quick shot combination will make it difficult for a defender to react in time.

DRILL #1: SHOT POWER & RELEASE FROM YOUR KNEES

STEP 1: ISOLATE

Isolate part of your shot so that you can generate more power and improve the accuracy in your release. The best way to do this is to isolate your upper body to see how much power you have. How do you remove your legs from a shooting drill you might ask? Simple, you kneel!

STEP 2: FOCUS ON UPPER BODY

Practice your shot from kneeling on either 1 or 2 knees, or sitting on something, depending on your size. Using only your upper body without relying on weight transfer you can test your hockey strength and pay attention to how you get power in your shot. This also helps you improve your shot.


This drill helps you improve how much power you shoot with and challenges your body to get a decent shot even when you aren’t lined up in the perfect situation. This hockey training drill forces you to get outside of your comfort zone and forces your body to adapt.

Tip: Try out HS Lightweight Pucks to make sure you are able to build some momentum and get a good snap.

DRILL #2: QUICK RELEASE SHOTS

STEP 1: SHORTEN YOUR WIND-UP

Like a one-timer, if you have a big wind-up, you are giving the goaltender time to move into position for your shot. Drag your stick back to the back heel of your skate and release the puck using the push/ pull motion. The push/pull motion is probably the component that makes the quick release so effective. Essentially, the “push” refers to a hockey player pushing or extending his/ her arms out from the body. Next comes the “pull” effect, which is the notion that a hockey player pulls his/ her top hand back, while pushing forward on the lower hand. Keep in mind, the flex of the stick can play a vital role in this concept. A stick that has a lower flex will result in more whip or torque, resulting in a stronger release. However, a stick that is stiff or that has a higher flex, will result in a weaker shot.

STEP 2: CHANGING THE ANGLE OF THE SHOT

This does not necessarily mean changing the angle of shot elevation, rather, it means changing the angle of the release point. For example, if you were approaching the goaltender and were ready to take a shot, the goaltender can anticipate the location of the shot by simply watching the blade of the stick. However, if you were to approach that same goaltender later in the game and were ready to let go a quick release shot, you could be deceptive by slightly changing the release point by doing a slight toe drag, moving the puck closer to your body, then releasing it. Just by moving the puck several inches can significantly change the possible locations that the puck can travel, causing the goaltender to readjust to the new release point. Practice the quick release from different angles by simply placing pucks in a square grid on your forehand, and shooting the pucks from inside, outside, ahead and in back of your stance.

Tip: Pick up a HS Shooting Pad and HS Extreme Shooter Tutor today and work on beating the goalie quickly before they can see the puck coming!

DRILL #3: MASTERING THE ZORRO

STEP 1: ROTATING HANDS

Start by setting the puck up on its edge. On your stick, keep your bottom hand loose to allow the shaft to rotate with the top hand.

STEP 2: CONTROLLING THE PUCK

Start of the forehand side on your near foot. Then, you’re going to open it up all the way to the backhand side. Move it back and forth to keep the puck up the blade the whole way.

STEP 3: TAKING THE SHOT

As you return the puck from the backhand side, quickly twist blade the other way and shoot the puck on net.


Tip: Work on your aim when taking a shot after completing the Zorro by using the HS Extreme Shooter Tutor or HS Sharpshooter Targets. You can put your own twist on how to finish the shot, whether you incorporate a body twist or rotating the stick with the puck just above the ice – this is where you can make it your own.

DRILL #4: TOE DRAG & QUICK SHOT

STEP 1: RECEIVE THE PASS

Using a passer (HS 4-Way Passer or a teammate), set up the passer in a few feet in front of the net, and position yourself a few feet in front of them. Send the puck into the passer and as it returns to you, do not stop your blade to take the shot. Move the blade of the stick in the direction of the anticipated pass.

STEP 2: AIM + SHOOT

When you retrieve the puck, in one fluid motion, toe drag nearside and aim for a shot on goal without missing a beat. If you’re a lefty make sure you shoot towards the right side of the net and if you’re a righty be sure to aim towards the left side of the net.

This drill helps you improve how much power you shoot with and challenges your body to get a decent shot even when you aren’t lined up in the perfect situation. This hockey training drill forces you to get outside of your comfort zone and forces your body to adapt.

This drill will help with muscle memory and will encourage your body to use the same force come real games when you are constantly moving and receiving passes. It will remind your body to toe drag and shoot when it receives a puck coming out of the crease.


Tip: Using an HS Extreme Passer or a 4-Way Elite Passer will give you the right tools to practice this drill from multiple angles.